The surname Enevold: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Enevold, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Enevold. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Enevold belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Enevold surname.

The heraldry of Enevold, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Enevold in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Enevold, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Enevold for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Enevold

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Enevold surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Enevold surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Enevold surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Enevold surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Enevold.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Enevold

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Enevold surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Enevold coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Enevold heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Enevold coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adorned - 1. When one piece is loaded with another figure. 2. Also said of any dress piece that is loaded with a piece or figure. (V. Adommed).
  • Aguila of Italy - 1. It is represented with only one head, separate wings, but not raised and glued tail.
  • Balza - 1. banner or flag used by the Knights Templar. It is represented with the Templar cross in the center.
  • Bandy Band - 1. Band formed by Blacks. (V. countercharged).
  • Barra-faja - 1. Piece that consists of the union of the bar and the girdle.
  • Civic crown - 1. It is the crown composed of fruity oak or oak branches. It paints closed and sinople.
  • Cruz-Barra - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed of the Union of the Cross and the bar.
  • Failed Chevron - 1. This term is applied to the chevron in which the vertex of the latter is separated. (V. failed).
  • Farm in bar - 1. It is said of the shield divided into three equal parts by lines that go from the sinister canton of the boss to the right hand of the beard or tip of the shield.
  • Fourth - 1. term used by some old heraldists to name the barracks. (V. barracks).
  • Genealogist - 1. It is said that the study of genealogies and lineages does profession.
  • Host - 1. Catholic cult object. Metal box in which non -consecrated hosts are stored. They can be painted round and flat with which a small cross is inserted.
  • Kite - 1. It is represented in the form of an eight -pointed star (some put it six, eight and twelve rays), with the tail waved or straight, whose length is three times the rays. Its normal position is in stick to the boss although it is also represented situ
  • Livery - 1. Library can be honor, ceremony and service. The former were and are used by the sovereigns, the great lords, military and gentlemen of the orders. The second for the kings of weapons, heralds, pharaute, persevering, ride
  • Raising - 1. It is said of a piece or part of a piece that is placed at a higher height from which it corresponds, especially the girdle or the cabrio.
  • Rampante Leon - 1. The rampant lion is the most used figure in the Spanish heraldry, and to a lesser extent in the European, its position is the one lifted on its hind rooms with the front claws in an attack position. (See rampant).
  • Ruante - 1. Apply to turkeys, mainly to the peacock with the extended tail completely open.
  • Sayo - 1. Wide and long jacket. In the Middle Ages the nobles, they carried it under the armor. It was made of wool, leather and iron meshes. The mesh level comes from it.
  • Sinister-Barra canton - 1. Composite piece resulting from the union of the sinister canton and the bar.
  • Terrace - 1. Figure that represents the ground and in which other figures are placed, it is located at the tip of the shield, they are usually painted in sinople or natural. Occupies the beard or campaign of the shield as a land and usually resembles an irregula mo
  • Truncada, Cruz - 1. Cross formed by square rectangles separated from each other.
  • twisted - 1. It is said of the cross with the twisted tips, a term used by some authors.