The surname Engelage: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Engelage, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Engelage. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Engelage belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Engelage surname.

The heraldry of Engelage, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Engelage in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Engelage, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Engelage for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Engelage

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Engelage surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Engelage surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Engelage surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Engelage surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Engelage.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Engelage

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Engelage surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Engelage coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Engelage heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Engelage coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bureaulada Cruz - 1. It is the cross that is loaded with burels.
  • Cruz de Avis - 1. Cruz Flordelisada de sinople, adopted by the Portuguese order of Avis.
  • Doncel helmet - 1. Iron or steel helmet, set up to the right -handed side, with open visor without any rack.
  • Flambante - 1. Palos, belts and wave bands that finish on the tip are understood as if they were flames. It derives from the Latin voice "Flamula", by the flame, however, our heralds want flambantes view of the French voice "flamb". (V. Flameante
  • Fruited - 1. Tree or bush loaded with the fruit that is own painted by a different enamel from the rest of the figure.
  • Hidalguía - 1. It is said that has the quality of Hidalgo.
  • Langrave crown - 1. Similar to that of German Duke. (See Crown of Duke German).
  • Nurido - 1. The plants and flowers that are not represented with the lower part of the trunk. 2. It is said of the lis flower that the lower part is missing.
  • Ricohombre - 1. The one that belonged to the first nobility of Spain. He held the palatine or administrative position, promoting part of the Royal Council and took part in the Cortes.
  • Saturn - 1. Sabble color name in real assemblies.
  • Shield heart - 1. It is said of the abyss or center of the shield.
  • Sparkling - 1. It is said of the piece that ends in acute tips. (V. vibrate).
  • Speakers, weapons - 1. They are those represented by a figure, which refers and designates the surname of the lineage they represent and graphically interprets the last name.
  • Tablecloth - 1. Curvilineal or triangular piece of the curtain or mantelado shield. (V. Cortinated, Mantelado).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.
  • Vervesor, Valvasor, VarVassor - 1. Terms used in some 16th -century Catalan manuscripts in Catalonia. In the feudal era vasallo of another vassal. 2. It also applied to a vassal that had a lower range. In Catalonia they were the last category of their own feudal lords