The surname English: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is English, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname English. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname English belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the English surname.

The heraldry of English, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname English in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname English, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname English for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of English

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the English surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the English surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the English surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the English surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of English.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname English

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the English surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the English coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the English heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the English coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Barbican - 1. Saetera or tronera in castles or strengths.
  • Bavarian crown - 1. Similar to the crown of Spain. Gold circle enriched rhinestones, enhanced by eight florons of acanthus leaves, celery, interspersed with one pearl each, which are held by eight headbands (only five are seen), entered of pearls and locks
  • Domus - 1. House or tower that is represented as a castle with two towers. Its heraldic design depends on the armature of each country.
  • Floors - 1. They are included in plants and variants: acanto, celery, lucena, thistle ivy, jasmine, parsley, rosef Manzano, moral, orange, walnut, olive, palm tree,
  • Fruited - 1. Tree or bush loaded with the fruit that is own painted by a different enamel from the rest of the figure.
  • Genealogist - 1. It is said that the study of genealogies and lineages does profession.
  • In a hurry - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in attitude of running.
  • JIRONADA CRUZ - 1. It is said of the cross in which in its center four girons of each arm of alternate colors converge.
  • lagoon - 1. It is represented in a portion of irregular water surrounded by earth.
  • Quixote - 1. ARNÉS piece that covers the thigh.
  • Santiago, Cruz de - 1. Sword -shaped gules color. Symbol of the Order of Santiago de la Espada, instituted in 1175. It was initially known by the Order of the Frailes of Cáceres.
  • Speakers, weapons - 1. They are those represented by a figure, which refers and designates the surname of the lineage they represent and graphically interprets the last name.
  • TRIDES CRUZ - 1. It is the cross formed by a trident.
  • Truncada, Cruz - 1. Cross formed by square rectangles separated from each other.
  • Turtledove - 1. Ave. It is represented with folded wings. It symbolizes as well as dove marital fidelity. (V. Paloma).
  • Vervesor, Valvasor, VarVassor - 1. Terms used in some 16th -century Catalan manuscripts in Catalonia. In the feudal era vasallo of another vassal. 2. It also applied to a vassal that had a lower range. In Catalonia they were the last category of their own feudal lords