The surname Engo: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Engo, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Engo. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Engo belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Engo surname.

The heraldry of Engo, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Engo in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Engo, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Engo for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Engo

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Engo surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Engo surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Engo surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Engo surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Engo.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Engo

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Engo surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Engo coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Engo heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Engo coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Badly cut - 1. Indicates the sleeves of a dress when they are not represented complete. Very old figure of European armor.
  • Barra-faja - 1. Piece that consists of the union of the bar and the girdle.
  • Cherub - 1. Only the head of an angel with two wings is usually drawn, with gold hair and wings can be enameled gold or silver with a face of carnation, but it should indicate the enamel in which it is painted. 2. External ornament of the shield. (V. Angelote).
  • Crenellated to gibelin. - 1. Type of encouragement with the aged battlements, typical of the Italian medieval heraldry and widely used in Catalonia.
  • diapreted - 1. Term used by some ancient authors. It was said when the field, belts, sticks and other nuanced of different colors and folk -shaped enamels or arabesque figures of different enamel or the same enamel. Very used in some armory
  • EANZADO - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in attitude of running, especially the deer.
  • Entrados - 1. The pieces and partitions of the shield that are nestled in the others in the form of a plug. (V. enado, nestled).
  • GOED AGUILA - 1. Said of the eagle that is loaded with drops of blood. (V. dripped).
  • Heraldry - 1. HERALDO POSITION. 2. Name given to the ceremony that was made to baptize the Heralds, an act in which the king emptied a glass of wine on the head of the applicant.
  • Kite - 1. It is represented in the form of an eight -pointed star (some put it six, eight and twelve rays), with the tail waved or straight, whose length is three times the rays. Its normal position is in stick to the boss although it is also represented situ
  • Orange - 1. One of the colors of English heraldry. When drawing it in black and white, it is represented by diagonal lines that go from the sinister barren canton of the boss, to the right hand of the tip, crossed by horizontal lines, filling the entire field of t
  • Sacred Ceremonies Figures - 1. Báculos, candelers, candles, bells, custodians, copones, reliquaries and rosaries, their enamel and situation in the shield must be indicated.
  • Sparkling - 1. It is said of the piece that ends in acute tips. (V. vibrate).
  • Tip - 1. It is said of the lower third of the shield. (V. Point of the shield, proportions). 2. In Punta locution used to designate the objects that can be one or more of them that are placed at the bottom of the field. (V. Pira).