The surname Cognat: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Cognat, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Cognat. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Cognat belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Cognat surname.

The heraldry of Cognat, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Cognat in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Cognat, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Cognat for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Cognat

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Cognat surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Cognat surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Cognat surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Cognat surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Cognat.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Cognat

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Cognat surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Cognat coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Cognat heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Cognat coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Angleada - 1. Said by some authors to bands, bars, sticks, crosses, etc., whose edges are presented with a row of media circles united by the tips they look out. (V. Anglelada, Anglesada, Holding).
  • Bicuciferous - 1. It is the result of a full and narrow cross, highlighted on a Sotuer or a flanquis.
  • Contrafilete - 1. It is said of the piece that wears two fillets. (V. fillet, threchor).
  • Eagle - 1. There are countless designs and representations. Except description to the contrary, its regular position is with the wings extended and raised, the tail low and scattered, sometimes it is represented crowned and sometimes, that is, with the
  • Fifth girdle - 1. term used by Spanish heraldist, equivalent to quinquefolia. (V. Quinquefolio)
  • Flanked - 1. It is said of the shield when divided into three equal parts delimited by two vertical, angled lines, curves of a 1/5 width of the shield. Almost non -existent in Spanish heraldry. 2. Figure that starting from the flanks of the shield by half
  • Floors - 1. They are included in plants and variants: acanto, celery, lucena, thistle ivy, jasmine, parsley, rosef Manzano, moral, orange, walnut, olive, palm tree,
  • Half flight down - 1. The tips of the half flight or wing must point in the direction of the shield.
  • Intern - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in an attitude of walking, usually in the direction of the right -hand flank of the shield. Some writer uses this term erroneously to indicate a human figure placed or in an attitude of moving. This term
  • King's head - 1. It is represented in profile or front, with the bearded and crowned to the old.
  • Ladies, shield - 1. The shield of the ladies or ladies is usually in the form of Losanje, some instead of using those of their lineage, use their husbands. In some married ladies shields, there are half of the husband's weapons to the right hand and half of those that L
  • oars - 1. Naval rig. The oars will be represented with the shovel looking towards the head of the shield or located as a complement in a boat.
  • Orange - 1. One of the colors of English heraldry. When drawing it in black and white, it is represented by diagonal lines that go from the sinister barren canton of the boss, to the right hand of the tip, crossed by horizontal lines, filling the entire field of t
  • Saber - 1. Name given to the black color used in heraldry, graphically represented by a vertical scratch and another horizontal forming a grid. There is a belief that blazons that carry this color are obliged to help those who have no
  • Secondon-na - 1. Son or daughter who is not the firstborn of the offspring of a family in which there is mayorazgo.
  • town - 1. Unlike the city, it is usually represented by rows of houses on some followed by others and in three or four orders as a belt, in the center a bell tower is usually added to a weather vane. In ancient shields appears l
  • vane - 1. Species of dress or headdress of the head, like a lambrequin called weather vane or steering wheel by the old heralds, tied behind the helmet with a bandage or braid composed of tapes and cords intertwined with the colors of the shield, turned to the w