The surname Colaco: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colaco, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colaco. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colaco belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colaco surname.

The heraldry of Colaco, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colaco in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colaco, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colaco for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colaco

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colaco surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colaco surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colaco surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colaco surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colaco.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colaco

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colaco surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colaco coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colaco heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colaco coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Broken column - 1. A column, broken in two halves, represents the strength in heraldry.
  • Calf - 1. Its characteristic is to represent you without cornice.
  • Cruz de Santa Tecla - 1. Tao cross. Adopted as emblem by some cathedrals. (V. Tao).
  • detellado - 1. term used to designate the piece whose profile is made up of small teeth. 2. According to some traders the space between each tooth if it is circular. (V. Danchado).
  • dextropiro, destrocero, dextrocero - 1. Terms used to designate the entire human arm, always showing the elbow. Movie of the right -hand flank, dressed, naked or armed.
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • General Lieutenant - 1. Military position in Spain. They surround their candle or banner or other badge of their position with six flags and six standards. These carry real weapons embroidered in their center.
  • Nurido - 1. The plants and flowers that are not represented with the lower part of the trunk. 2. It is said of the lis flower that the lower part is missing.
  • opposite - 1. It is said of the cut shield whose division line is part two enameled triangles from one to the other. (V. from one to the other).
  • Quoted - 1. Narrow or decreased first -degree band, reduced to half of its width, some heraldists are from the opinion, which has to be the third part to the band or 1/9 of the width of the blazon. Diminished honorable piece.
  • Royal Crown of Portugal - 1. Similar to the Spanish Royal Crown. (See Spanish Royal Corona).
  • Shaded - 1. Said of the pieces and figures that are not flat and mark a shadow. In some treaties it is indicated that furniture must paint plans, without shadows or reliefs.
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.
  • Spiral. - 1. whose figure is adorned with elements in a spiral form. Used in some Nordic armories, non -existent in Spain.
  • Stick-semibanda - 1. It is the result of the union and the lower half of the band.
  • Terrace - 1. Figure that represents the ground and in which other figures are placed, it is located at the tip of the shield, they are usually painted in sinople or natural. Occupies the beard or campaign of the shield as a land and usually resembles an irregula mo
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.