The surname Engelson: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Engelson, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Engelson. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Engelson belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Engelson surname.

The heraldry of Engelson, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Engelson in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Engelson, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Engelson for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Engelson

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Engelson surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Engelson surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Engelson surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Engelson surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Engelson.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Engelson

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Engelson surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Engelson coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Engelson heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Engelson coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adommed - 1. When one piece is loaded with another. Disused term. (V. adorned).
  • Ancorada Cruz - 1. Cross in which their ends separate and end in the form of anchor.
  • Bastard helmet - 1. The bastard helmet is put out in profile, accidental, with low visor, bordura stuck with gold. Some shields hold the wrecked helmet without being a sign of bastardy, it is usually due to the ignorance of the sculptor who designed and sculpted ignoring
  • blood - 1. Red color. Erroneously used by some ancient authors when describing gules. (V. Gules).
  • Cartela lying down - 1. Cartela to which contrary to its natural position is in horizontal position.
  • Chestnut - 1. Tree, which is usually represented with the trunk, branches and leaves of its natural or sinople color, fruity and torn. It is painted with the thick trunk and wide and round cup. 2. Color widely used in the Middle Ages in Italian assemblies.
  • COLERO - 1. Term used by some ancient authors to define the lion who hides the tail. (V. cowardly).
  • Cruz-Barra - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed of the Union of the Cross and the bar.
  • face - 1. The human face of its natural color or other enamels that admits the heraldry is usually painted. It can be represented in profile or front.
  • Failed Chevron - 1. This term is applied to the chevron in which the vertex of the latter is separated. (V. failed).
  • FLANCHIS - 1. Term used to designate a figure in the form of Sotuer Abcisa and small, can go in the field alone or in several of them. (V. flanquis).
  • Floors - 1. They are included in plants and variants: acanto, celery, lucena, thistle ivy, jasmine, parsley, rosef Manzano, moral, orange, walnut, olive, palm tree,
  • GOED AGUILA - 1. Said of the eagle that is loaded with drops of blood. (V. dripped).
  • Half flight down - 1. The tips of the half flight or wing must point in the direction of the shield.
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Orange - 1. One of the colors of English heraldry. When drawing it in black and white, it is represented by diagonal lines that go from the sinister barren canton of the boss, to the right hand of the tip, crossed by horizontal lines, filling the entire field of t
  • Quadrifolio - 1. Figure that represents a flower of four leaves or rounded petals and finishes on a slight tip, perforated in its center. It resembles the four -leaf clover. Used in the Central European Heraldic.
  • Shield - 1. According to July of Atienza in its dictionary it reflects this term, it could be a scude. (V. Escudete).
  • Tip - 1. It is said of the lower third of the shield. (V. Point of the shield, proportions). 2. In Punta locution used to designate the objects that can be one or more of them that are placed at the bottom of the field. (V. Pira).