The surname Colage: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colage, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colage. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colage belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colage surname.

The heraldry of Colage, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colage in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colage, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colage for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colage

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colage surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colage surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colage surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colage surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colage.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colage

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colage surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colage coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colage heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colage coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Band-semeifaja - 1. Piece that results from the union of the band and half sinister of the girdle
  • Boss and lifting - 1. Curvilíneo triangle that has its vertex in the center of the lower line of the boss and its base at the bottom of it.
  • Cantado - 1. When a main piece is accompanied by another in the cantons of the shield. Generally the Cross or the Sotuer accompanied by four pieces or figures arranged in the flanks between the arms 2. It is said of four figures or furniture placed in the four
  • Contrafilete - 1. It is said of the piece that wears two fillets. (V. fillet, threchor).
  • Cruz de Santa Tecla - 1. Tao cross. Adopted as emblem by some cathedrals. (V. Tao).
  • displaced - 1. term used to designate the piece whose length half of which moves to the right -handed side, sinister towards the boss or the tip of the shield. You only maintain contact with the other half by a point as well as the girdle. If the separation line
  • Elm - 1. This tree is represented elongated. Symbolism: Dignity.
  • Fruited - 1. Tree or bush loaded with the fruit that is own painted by a different enamel from the rest of the figure.
  • General Lieutenant - 1. Military position in Spain. They surround their candle or banner or other badge of their position with six flags and six standards. These carry real weapons embroidered in their center.
  • Heart - 1. The human or animal heart represents and paints naturally. It appears in some inflamed or flaming blazons. 2. Some authors call the panela.
  • Jealousy - 1. Blazon or piece when covered with canes, elongated pieces, such as trailers or spears on the form of a blade or intersecting as a lattice or fence. (V. frozen).
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • Open Crown - 1. It is said of the crown that does not wear headbands.
  • Parrot - 1. Ave. It is usually painted green, although it can occur in another colors. It usually appears in action to march looking next to the shield. Symbol of the gentleman who proud of his blazon.
  • Potented - 1. This term is applied to the shield field which is covered by poenzas arranged so that the field of it can be seen. 2. Term used to designate the cross, whose extremes of the arms end in a potent. 3. It is said of the girdle
  • SCIENCE TREE - 1. The tree of science is represented, with four branches forming a circle up, and in each of them with thirteen leaves. Very rare figure in Spanish heraldry.
  • SEMIPALO-FAJA - 1. Composite piece resulting from the union of the upper half of the stick and the girdle.
  • town - 1. Unlike the city, it is usually represented by rows of houses on some followed by others and in three or four orders as a belt, in the center a bell tower is usually added to a weather vane. In ancient shields appears l